Handling your Child's Bad Report CardYour immediate reaction to when your child brings home a bad report card might be to yell and punish, but bad grades is not really end of the world.

Dealing with a bad report card can take some subtlety and may need you to step back and look at it from a different viewpoint.
An unsatisfactory score can become a sensitive tripwire for child and parents alike.

The best advice is not to react with displeasure. A bad grade is often an indication towards a potential problem area, not towards your kid’s worth or your parenting abilities. Collect your views and react in a peaceful, clear way.
Applaud and acknowledge the A in the good attendance, art, the polite attitude. Then emphasize on areas that needs to be improved. Reassure your kid that low grade doesn’t make him a failure and that you can help in finding strategies that would improve his performance.

Talk, don’t Lecture!Children tend to tune out lectures. Instead, ask them “What do they think happened?” It’s most likely that they will point out the problem and the solution as well.

Think Talent, not Perfection. Some kids are average students, yet they outshine in art, music or athletics. Encourage their gifts but talk about your expectations too.Instead ofpushing for straight A’s, expect your child to be talented in both social-emotional and academic learning. This includes lifetime learning skills, such as team spirit, problem solving, communication and critical thinking.

Meet the Tutor.Understand about the tutoring rules and style, and ways you can support your child. The more you understand and communicate, the lesser the odds of your child’s success.

Your job is not finished until you’ve assisted your child get the support he requires to develop and improve his grades. Don’t hesitate to contact their tutor if needed. Assist him in outlining his time. Your child is relying on you to help him, not bail on him.